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Semantics – your key to better copy and better SEO

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"Lupa.na.encyklopedii" by Julo - Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Lupa.na.encyklopedii” by JuloOwn work. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

We have entered the age of semantic search. In terms of SEO, it is an important step. It makes search more intelligent and more relevant to users.

Semantics is all about meaning. The fact that there are so many different ways of expressing a single thought or question is important. People aren’t always going to use identical search queries, and we don’t all write about topics according to one universal style guide, even if we all follow the same laws of English.

What is Semantic Search?

The advantage of this search development is that Google not only understands what you said, but what you meant. You can see this in action by picking a service and searching for the ‘benefits’ of it. Google will also return articles on the ‘advantages’ of that service, because it knows those two things mean the same thing in this context. This is useful for searchers – because imagine missing out on great pudding recipes because you looked for ‘desserts’.

Those are simplified examples. What semantics allows us to do is focus more on providing quality writing rather than ticking SEO boxes. We no longer have to pack blogs, articles, and web copy full of “meat” – we can talk about “chicken”, “pork”, “bacon”, “beef”, and so on. It makes for a more interesting, more readable piece of writing. We can still optimise our copy, yet in a more subtle way.

Semantics in copywriting

Semantics has always been useful in copywriting. It’s how we prevent our prose from becoming boring. It means we can say something is fantastic, handy, cool, awesome, wonderful, brilliant, great, and so on, instead of just ‘nice’ all the time.

People get bored of seeing the same word several times, and repetition can jar people out of the reading ‘zone’. Repetition is bad. Avoid repetition. Spoils the moment, doesn’t it?

Semantics also helps us to tailor our writing to get the best response from the target audience. Think about how moisturiser for women ‘rejuvenates’ (a soft, caring, feminine sort of word), whereas men’s face cream ‘re-energises’ (an action-packed, masculine sort of word). They both do the same thing – make you more moist than you were originally – it’s just the semantics are different, because men and women want to moisturize for different reasons.

How has semantic search changed your SEO policy?


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